A history of the jewish synagogue the tree of life in the city of columbia

The creation of the United States of America represented a unique event in world history — founded as a modern republic, it was rooted in the Bible, and one of its earliest tenets was religious tolerance. This is because many of the earliest pilgrims who settled the "New England" of America in early 17th century were Puritan refugees escaping religious persecutions in Europe. These Puritans viewed their emigration from England as a virtual re-enactment of the Jewish exodus from Egypt. They were the new Israelites, entering into a new covenant with God in a new Promised Land.

A history of the jewish synagogue the tree of life in the city of columbia

It's contents have been put together based on information supplied by members of the Amdur family 'olumi'. Its purpose is to give us a history, roots, and to allow all of us a sense of belonging. Please add to it by forwarding missing or corrected information, stories you heard from your grandparents about the old countries, and most important - photos, both of your generation as well as of those no longer with us.

Images allow the trees to have meaning beyond that of just relationships. Enjoy meeting your family! Along the way, we have acquired considerable data about many other Amdur families as well.

A history of the jewish synagogue the tree of life in the city of columbia

This Web site has been designed to share all of that information. About the Amdurs All of the Amdurs we have found to date appear to belong to one of three seemingly disparate branches.

Our branch lived in the Braslav uyezd township of the Novo Aleksandrovsk district of what in the19th century was first Vilna and then Kovno guberniya province of Russia. Virtually all Amdurs who came from what today is Latvia or Lithuania have been shown to be part of the Braslav Amdurs.

This group would also include those Amdurs who ventured to Dvinsk, Kamajai, and Rokiskis, as documented by the Pages of Testemony after the Sho'ar. They emigrated to the United States, possibly from Bialystok, at the end of the 19th century and settled in Pittsburgh.

Many of them later shortened their name to Amdur. They too have shortened their name to Amdur although, like the Pittsburgh Amdurs, they originally were Amdursky. We do not know yet if the two Amdursky barnches are connected or if the Mogilev gouping is connected to the Braslav Amdur branch.

Facial similarities suggest that there is a strong family linkage.

Columbia, the capital city of South Carolina, is a two-hour drive from Charleston, and in Memorial Park I visited a very striking Holocaust Monument. Engraved on a central, gray, granite stone is a map of concentration camps in Latvia, Germany, Poland, Hungary and France where the Final Solution was carried out. Tree of Life is an unusually musical congregation—a great place to sing along, join the HHD choir, or simply sit back and enjoy all the music in the service, including monthly “Shabbat Live” services that feature a backup band of temple members/5(25). Pearlstine / Lipov Center for Southern Jewish Culture brings together the resources of the Jewish Studies Program, the Jewish Heritage Collection, and the Jewish Historical Society of South lausannecongress2018.comties include speakers, film screenings, online exhibitions, and a research fellowship program.

The variant Amdurer also exists. Amduras, a Latvian form of the name, appeared in the 20th century. Some of those in our database use that spelling, although they originally were probably just Amdur. A few also became Emdur.

Yiddish speakers frequently transform the N sound into an M. They wrote the name Indura as aleph, mem, daleth, resh and pronounced it Amdur.

Most Jews of Eastern Europe did not have hereditary family names until required by law to adopt them. The Russian law mandating the adoption of fixed surnames was enacted in This website is run by Sallyann Amdur Sack-Pikus & Mike lausannecongress2018.com's contents have been put together based on information supplied by members of the Amdur family 'olumi'.

This month’s Kugels & Collards post is by Olivia Brown, graduate student at University of South Carolina, who is writing her master’s thesis about the history of Jewish delis in . Columbia’s Jewish community founded the nation’s seventh Jewish religious school in and the city’s first synagogue, Shearith Israel (Remnant of Israel), three years later.

The early Jewish community of Columbia played an active part in the development and growth of the city. People of modest means – peddlers, artisans, metalworkers, bakers – the newcomers gave the city's Jewish population a more foreign appearance than before. As early as , In Pursuit of the Tree of Life: A History of the Early Jews of Columbia and the Tree of Life Congregation ();.

Kristallnacht, which took place 80 years ago this month, saw hundreds of synagogues burned, Jewish-owned businesses destroyed, Jews murdered.

Tree of Life is an unusually musical congregation—a great place to sing along, join the HHD choir, or simply sit back and enjoy all the music in the service, including monthly “Shabbat Live” services that feature a backup band of temple members/5(25).

History of the Jews in Colombia - Wikipedia