Discourse communities

In this academic essay Swales is outlining his ideas on Discourse communities. He explains a Discourse community as a body of people working towards a common goal while sharing a set of ideas and rules; unlike speech communities you may be initiated into a Discourse community.

Discourse communities

As we discussed in class discourse communities can be being on a sports team, being a member of a club, even where you work is also a type of discourse community. The first community I chose was Facebook.

Facebook is an online community in which you can communicate with friends and meet new people. To be a member a Facebook, first you have to make an account which is very simple, all you have to do is put your name, date of birth, gender, and email address.

You can do many more things on Facebook besides that, you can add pictures and tag your friends, you can play games and compete against your friends, you can be invited to different events that are going on by your friends, and you can also send your friends bumper stickers and other funky things that you can post on their profile.

Over all I think Facebook is a very fun way to communicate not only with friends but also with family. At this church I have participated in many discourse groups which mainly have the same purpose. During this course we rarely wrote and if we did it was mainly informal.

What Is a Discourse Community? (with pictures)

We usually go out to other churches and give retreats which would be the whole purpose of our group. To work here you have to speak Spanish since it is a salon in Chihuahua and you have to have some types of skills with hair or nails.

At this salon I was the secretary, which meant I wrote down the appointments and charged any type of service given at the salon. I also once in a while helped the main stylist with straightening hair or curling it and other similar things.

But as the secretary I also had to write a list of the inventory and what we had and what was needed.

Discourse communities

So these where some of the discourse communities I have participated in. Some involving online communication, others dealing with spiritual or religious topics, and the last involved being employed.

Over all I think I have a very diverse group of discourse communities which I like because they allow me to communicate, share and learn different things that may make me a better person and which in general are a part of me.So for the discourse community map I have chosen 3 discourse communities I have been in or that I am still in; Facebook, SDLM, which stands for a church called El Señor de la Misericordia, and my old job at Uñas Salon y Mas.

Discourse communities require a network of communication where the members of it can be any amount of distance apart as long as they operate with the same language, but speech communities require proximity to convey the culture of their language.

Ask a Librarian

Oct 14,  · A discourse community is a group of people who "speak the same language" or in other words people who share an interest in certain topics, share a body of knowledge about those topics, and possess a common Status: Resolved. Discourse Communities! Swales first characteristic is, “A discourse community has a broadly agreed set of common public goals” ().

This is the idea that the group of people all have a set of shared goals they all are hoping to reach! Such communities are defined by the discourse on commonly shared aims and objectives of the people within it. Owing to their versatile and intangible nature, discourse communities operate in forums where the community members participate in a preferred manner.

Summary. In this academic essay Swales is outlining his ideas on Discourse communities. He explains a Discourse community as a body of people working towards a common goal while sharing a set of ideas and rules; unlike speech communities you may be initiated into a Discourse community.

Discourse community - Wikipedia